National Action Plan for Endometriosis

Health Minister Greg Hunt has launched the National Action Plan for Endometriosis — the first ever blueprint seeking to improve the treatment, understanding and awareness of an often misunderstood and crippling condition.

Endometriosis affects 1 in every 10 Australian women, with the average diagnosis taking between 7 to 10 years. The plan was developed with medical specialists, endometriosis advocacy groups, women with endometriosis and their families, clinicians, researchers and parliamentarians.

In launching the action plan, Minister Hunt noted that while we were at the beginning of this journey, the plan — which outlines a comprehensive 5 year strategy — was a significant step forward for sufferers.

National Action Plan for Endometriosis

Finding real mental health solutions for rural Australia

AUSTRALIA’S mental health support services cannot use a one size fits all approach to lowering rates of mental illness and suicide in rural parts of the nation.
 
This is the opinion of Lifeline Research Foundation executive director Alan Woodward, who said there were a number of unique facets to rural living that led to different challenges than those faced in the city.
 
“The statistics are not great, it shows the further away from a capital city you live the higher the suicide rate is,” Mr Woodward told last week’s Innovation Generation conference in Wagga Wagga.

He said researchers were discovering a range of factors for the poor mental health ratings in rural areas.
 
Read more at: https://www.theland.com.au/story/5532370/finding-real-mental-health-solutions-for-rural-australia/?cs=4932

Aboriginal kids: a healthy start to life

This report was developed in collaboration with the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council and focuses on key improvements in the health of Aboriginal children in New South Wales in the first 5 years of life.

The report emphasises the importance of services and programs being carried out in partnership with Aboriginal people, their communities, the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Sector and across government. Services and programs that have helped to achieve improvements in Aboriginal child health are highlighted throughout the report.

The report is divided into 3 life stages: before birth, infant health and early childhood.

Aboriginal kids: a healthy start to life (Report of the NSW Chief Health Officer 2018).

Assuring equity of access and quality outcomes for older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples: what needs to be done?

This report outlines the proceedings and outcomes of the 5th National Workshop of the Australian Association of Gerontology Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ageing Advisory Group held in Perth in November 2017.

The workshop aimed to address the inequities of access and outcomes for older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples under the current aged care reform program, and suggest directions for the future.

Key issues identified at the workshop were:

  • current barriers to equity of access and quality outcomes
  • specialist targeted services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elders
  • delivery of appropriate care by mainstream aged care service providers
  • an aged care workforce that improves access and quality care
  • advocacy services
  • appropriate aged care needs assessment
  • an evidence-based approach.

Assuring equity of access and quality outcomes for older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples: what needs to be done?

Better Cardiac Care measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (AIHW)

This is the 3rd national report on the 21 Better Cardiac Care measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, with updated data available to report on 14 measures. It shows that while the mortality rate from cardiac conditions is falling among Indigenous Australians, it is still much higher than among non-Indigenous Australians. While access to cardiac-related health services is improving the incidence and recurrent rates of acute rheumatic fever among Indigenous Australians continue to be much higher than in non-Indigenous Australians.

Press release (AHHA): Come a long way, long way to go—cardiac care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Sleep deprived: a third of Australians 'suffering social jetlag'

Almost one in three Australians suffers “social jet lag”, according to a researcher seeking an inquiry into the nation’s sleep deprivation problem. The University of Adelaide sleep specialist Robert Adams said a growing body of research suggested poor sleep was taking a serious toll on Australians’ health and welfare.

A study led by Adams, published on Monday in the journal Sleep Medicine, found that 31% of survey respondents were suffering social jetlag. That is, the time of their sleep on work nights was more than an hour out of sync with sleeps on weekends or other days off.

Read more at: https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2018/jul/09/sleep-deprived-a-third-of-australians-suffering-social-jetlag