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Monday, 30 January 2017

Good outcomes with 'telepsychiatry' in medical treatment of opioid use disorder

For people with opioid use disorder receiving medication treatment with buprenorphine, a telepsychiatry approach--using videoconferencing as an alternative to in-person group sessions--provides similar clinical outcomes, reports a study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM). The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.


The pilot study suggests that telepsychiatry might help to extend the availability of medication for addiction treatment (often known as medication-assisted treatment, or MAT) for opioid use disorder--particularly in rural areas. "Telepsychiatry may present a promising way to deliver MAT to this population and expand access to care," write Dr. Wanhong Zheng and colleagues of West Virginia University, Morgantown.


See more at: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-01/wkh-gow012517.php

Friday, 13 January 2017

Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in Australian public hospitals 2015-16 (AIHW)

Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in Australian public hospitals 2015-16: Australian hospital statistics

* In 2015-16, 1,440 cases of hospital-associated Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) were reported in Australian public hospitals

* The national rate of SAB in public hospitals was 0.73 cases per 10,000 days of patient care, and all states and territories had rates below the national benchmark of 2.0 cases per 10,000 days of patient care

* Between 2011-12 and 2015-16, rates of SAB decreased from 0.96 cases to 0.73 cases per 10,000 days of patient care

Download report: Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in Australian public hospitals 2015-16: Australian hospital statistics

Monday, 9 January 2017

National Cultural Respect Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health 2016–2026

The National Cultural Respect Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health 2016–2026 (the Framework) was launched by the Australian Health Ministers' Advisory Council on 28 October 2016. This 10 year framework seeks to guide delivery of culturally safe, responsive, and quality health care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people generally experience poorer health outcomes than the rest of the Australian population, and while the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people has improved in a number of areas in recent years, ongoing effort is required to achieve sustainable improvements in health outcomes. A fundamental step towards improving health outcomes is to address the many barriers Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience in accessing and receiving appropriate and professional health care. The Framework provides the foundation and guides a nationally consistent approach for building culturally responsive health care design and delivery for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and contributes to achieving the Closing the Gap targets agreed by the Council of Australian Governments (COAG).

The Framework is a renewal of the Cultural Respect Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health 2004–2009 and was developed for the Australian Health Ministers' Advisory Council by the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Standing Committee.

Cultural Respect Framework 2016-2026 for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health

National Framework for Health Services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children and Families

The National Framework for Health Services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children and Families will help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children to get a better start in life. It provides a guide for culturally appropriate maternal health care, pregnancy care and early childhood – setting children and families up for better health throughout their lives.

This work was developed in collaboration with community leaders and a cultural advisory group. We also have consulted widely with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities across the country, listening to what they need, so we can deliver the services that they require in the way that best suits different communities," said Assistant Minister Wyatt.

The Framework will be embedded at the Commonwealth level in Funding Agreements, raising awareness through Aboriginal Health Partnership forums and including the principles in our policy design and program implementation. For example, the Department of Education and Training has agreed to incorporate the Framework into the implementation of Connected Beginnings, building the same principles and shared vision for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children's health across disciplines and jurisdictions.

The National Framework for Health Services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children and Families >

Launch Press Release