Thursday, 27 April 2017

Clinical governance for Primary Health Networks

Clinical governance for Primary Health NetworkResponding to the needs of people who are most at risk of poor health outcomes is a priority for governments and communities across Australia. While definitions vary, there is widespread agreement in the literature that the commissioning of health services is more than traditional planning, funding and procurement. It is the process for deciding how to use the total health resources available in order to improve outcomes in the most efficient, effective, equitable and sustainable way.



http://apo.org.au/files/Resource/210417_issues_brief_no_22-_clinical_governance_for_phns.pdf

This issues brief from the Deeble Institute for Health Policy Research, sets out the rationale for developing and implementing a clinical governance framework for Primary Health Networks (PHNs) in commissioning the provision of primary health services that are safe and effective. It provides principles that inform clinical governance policy including recommendations on how clinical governance should be supported in commissioning undertaken by PHNs for contract development, management, auditing and compliance. PHNs also have a role in influencing the uptake of quality improvement activities in general practice including the interface between primary care and community services.

The critical areas in ensuring clinical governance are:

* Consumers having opportunities to manage their own health and also participate in innovation and value creation through co-design processes.
* Clinician-led workforce that enables PHNs to make informed decisions about commissioning health services with providers who have the appropriate capacity and expertise to deliver safe care.
* Delivery of safe quality care through identifying areas for practice improvement and those practices that may put consumers at risk of harm,and making recommendations to prevent or control those risks.
* Clinical risk management to ensure that service providers have the capacity to meet legislative requirements and national and jurisdictional standards when designing best practice for their service.



http://apo.org.au/files/Resource/210417_issues_brief_no_22-_clinical_governance_for_phns.pdf

Thursday, 20 April 2017

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia, 2015-16: key findings [AIHW]

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia, 2015-16: key findings



In 2015-16, around 796 alcohol and other drug treatment services provided just over 206,000 treatment episodes to an estimated 133,000 clients.

* The top 4 drugs that led clients to seek treatment were alcohol (32% of treatment episodes), cannabis (23%), amphetamines (23%) and heroin (6%).
* The proportion of episodes where clients were receiving treatment for amphetamines has continued to increase over the last 10 years, from 12% of treatment episodes in 2006-07 to 23% in 2015-16.
* The median age of clients in AOD treatment services is increasing, 33 years in 2015-16, up from 31 in 2006-07.

Download web report: Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia, 2015-16: key findings<http://www.aihw.gov.au/alcohol-and-other-drugs/data-sources/aodts-nmds-2015-16/>

Infographic: Alcohol & Other Drug Treatment Services 2015-16<http://www.aihw.gov.au/assets/0/140/6442453687/60129543187/60129543188/60129543191/60129543278/60129543279/afd4d5b1-049e-4a7a-ad45-1c59d87cd04d.jpg?n=8359>

Wednesday, 19 April 2017

5 new AIHW Injuries publications

Hospitalised assault injuries among women and girls fact sheet

Key findings:
* Rates of assault among women were highest for those aged between 15-19 and 50-54.
* Over half (59%) of all these women were assaulted by bodily force, and for assaults by bodily force and involving sharp and blunt objects, the majority of injuries were to the head and neck (63%).
* Where information about the perpetrator was available, a spouse or domestic partner was the most commonly reported perpetrator (in 59% of cases).

Media release: Domestic violence leading cause of hospitalised assault among girls and women


Dog-related injuries fact sheet

Firearm injuries and deaths fact sheet

DIY injuries fact sheet

Serious unintentional injury involving a railway train or tram, Australia, 2009-10 to 2013-14 report

Thursday, 13 April 2017

Impact of overweight and obesity as a risk factor for chronic conditions [AIHW]

Impact of overweight and obesity as a risk factor for chronic conditions updates and extends estimates of the burden due to overweight and obesity reported in the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 to include burden in people aged under 25, revised diseases linked to overweight and obesity based on the latest evidence, and estimates by socioeconomic group.

* The report includes scenario modelling, undertaken to assess the potential impact on future health burden if overweight and obesity in the population continues to rise or is reduced.

* The enhanced analysis in the report shows that 7.0% of the total health burden in Australia in 2011 is due to overweight and obesity, and that this burden increased with increasing level of socioeconomic disadvantage.

Download report: Impact of overweight and obesity as a risk factor for chronic conditions

Media release: Small changes in our weight could significantly reduce health impact of obesity.

Tuesday, 4 April 2017

Early childhood the key to improving Indigenous health

A major study into the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children has found programs and policies to promote healthy weight should target children as young as three.

Lead researcher Katie Thurber from the Australian National University said the majority of Indigenous children in the national study had a healthy Body Mass Index, but around 40% were classified as overweight or obese by the time they reached 9 years of age.

Deeble issues brief on overweight and obesity among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children

Wednesday, 29 March 2017

Incidence of insulin-treated diabetes in Australia, 2015 [AIHW]

This fact sheet by the Australian Institute of Health & Welfare provides the latest available national data on new cases of insulin-treated diabetes in Australia.

It shows that in 2015 there were 28,775 people who began using insulin to treat their diabetes in Australia-63% had type 2 diabetes, 26% had gestational diabetes, 9% had type 1 diabetes and 2% had other forms of diabetes or their diabetes status was unknown.

The fact sheet is accompanied by a dynamic data display, which provides data on insulin-treated diabetes by age at first insulin use, Indigenous status, remoteness, SEIFA and state/territory.

Download report: Incidence of insulin-treated diabetes in Australia, 2015


Download dynamic data display: Incidence of insulin-treated diabetes in Australia dynamic data display

Monday, 6 March 2017

Oral health of Australian children: the National Child Oral Health Study 2012–14

Despite some improvement, child oral health has remained a significant population health issue in Australia in the 21st Century. The evidence described in this report has pointed to substantial social patterning of oral health status, dental service use and dental and general health behaviours among Australian children. The identification of the numerous factors and the relation between them at an individual child, family, school and community level poses both difficulties and opportunities for programs to make improvements to and reduce social inequalities in child oral health.

Oral health of Australian children: the National Child Oral Health Study 2012–14.

Tuesday, 28 February 2017

National key performance indicators for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care: preliminary results from May 2015 [AIHW]

National key performance indicators for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care: preliminary results from May 2015 captures summary data from around 240 primary health care organisations that received funding from the Australian Government Department of Health to provide services primarily to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as at May 2015.

It presents summary data for 21 indicators (14 process-of-care and 7 health outcome indicators) on maternal and child health, preventative health and chronic disease management. Complete results for May 2015 and June 2016 are due to be released in May 2017 in the National key performance indicators for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care: results from June 2016.

Download data report: National key performance indicators for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care: preliminary results for May 2015

Tuesday, 21 February 2017

The economic cost of dementia in Australia

Alzheimer's Australia commissioned NATSEM at the Institute for Governance and Policy Analysis at the University of Canberra to estimate the cost of dementia in Australia. The economic impact of dementia is a major concern nationally and internationally as the number of individuals with dementia continues to rise. Access Economics(2003) estimated the total cost of dementia to be $6.6 billion in 2002.

Economic cost of dementia in Australia 2016-2056 shows that the cost of dementia in Australia in 2016 is $14.25 billion, which equates to an average cost of $35,550 per person with dementia. Not only does this report update the Access Economics 2002 estimate to 2016, it also projects likely future costs of dementia over the next 40 years. In doing so, it provides an overview of dementia in Australia, including increases in the prevalence and incidence of dementia over the next 40 years, describes some of the social and economic characteristics of people with dementia, and identifies the impact of dementia on mortality and burden of disease.

The need for care and provision of care services is also reported on, including estimating the future need for both informal and formal carers in both the community and residential aged care sectors. The report models direct and indirect costs of dementia in 2016 out to 2056. The impact on costs of a 'hypothetical' intervention program that reduces the annual incidence of dementia by 5% is modelled. A second scenario simulates the impact of 'hypothetical' technological change in hospital care and its impact on costs.

9th Closing the Gap report

This is a report card on how we, as a nation, are meeting our responsibilities in improving outcomes for our First Australians. This report recognises changes are underway and successes are being achieved, however, progress overall nationally, is too slow.

The Closing the Gap targets address the areas of health, education and employment, and provide an important snapshot of where progress is being made and where further efforts are needed. We know we will not make the necessary gains across any of these areas if we don't work in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It is only once we establish effective mechanisms for working together, for supporting decision-making at the community level, that we are likely to see the gains needed to meet the targets.

The importance of culture cannot be underestimated in working to close the gap. The connection to land, family and culture is fundamental to the wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures are the world's oldest continuous cultures—they have stood the test of time. We must continue to preserve and respect Indigenous cultures for this generation and the future and we must acknowledge the impact of past policies on our First Australians, and work to heal the wounds of the past.

We need to look at what the evidence tells us will work and, where needed, invest in better understanding the most effective solutions. Our ambitious reform agenda, with COAG and Indigenous leaders, will consider learnings over the last decade under Closing the Gap and where we need to change course to deliver sustainable change.

9th Closing the Gap Report.

Healthcare-associated Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections in 2015-16 [AIHW]

Healthcare-associated Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections in 2015-16 includes new data on rates of healthcare-associated Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections (Golden Staph) for Australian public hospitals in 2015-16. Major hospitals continue to record the highest rates of infections, which have been declining nationally over the past six years from 1.68 cases per 10,000 days of patient care in 2010-11 to 1.02 cases per 10,000 in 2015-16. Information is provided via Excel downloads and on reported hospitals results pages. A new interactive table allows users to see how rates in public hospitals compare over a six-year period.

Download report: Healthcare-associated Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections in 2015-16

Tuesday, 14 February 2017

NSW Emergency departments website

NSW Health has launched a new Real-Time Emergency Department website.

The purpose of this website is to inform members of the public about availability of emergency departments in major NSW hospitals. The website also allows to locate the nearest hospitals and to see a number of patients waiting in the Emergency Rooms.

http://www.emergencywait.health.nsw.gov.au/

Changing associations of selected social determinants with Aboriginal and torres Strait Island health & wellbeing, 2002 to 2012-13

Changing associations of selected social determinants with Aboriginal and torres Strait Island health & wellbeing, 2002 to 2012-13 by the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research uses data from national health and social surveys of the Indigenous population, conducted between 2002 and 2012-13, to examine whether associations of some key social determinants with selected health and wellbeing outcomes changed over that time.

Consistently during the decade, employment status and housing tenure were significantly associated with a range of health and wellbeing outcomes for the Indigenous population.

As education levels have increased among the Indigenous population, the association of education with health and wellbeing has weakened. This suggests that at least some of the association of education with health and wellbeing is attributable to other characteristics of individuals or educational institutions not captured in our models, not just the outcome of the education process itself.

Improvements in some health and wellbeing outcomes in remote areas, despite declining employment over the decade, suggest that more detailed analysis is required to shed light on whether associations between the selected social determinants of health and wellbeing differ for Indigenous people living in remote and nonremote areas.

Monday, 13 February 2017

Hospitalised burn injuries Australia 2013-14 [AIHW]

Hospitalised burn injuries Australia 2013-14 provides information on cases of burn injury requiring hospitalisation in Australia. While burn injuries make up a small fraction (1%) of all hospitalisations for injury, they are often the most serious and result in numerous re-admissions and long lengths of stay.

In 2013-14 there were 5,430 cases of hospitalised burn injury of which about two-thirds were male. Almost half of all cases (45%) were caused by contact with heat and hot substances such as hot drinks, food, fats and cooking oils.

Download report: Hospitalised burn injuries Australia 2013-14

A Global Snapshot of Indigenous and Tribal People’s Health: The Lancet–Lowitja Institute Collaboration

The purpose of this report is to provide a more detailed understanding of the context of each population included in a paper published by The Lancet in April 2016, 'Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Health (The Lancet–Lowitja Institute Collaboration): A population study' by I. Anderson, B. Robson, M. Connolly et al.

Contributors have endeavoured to provide a summary of the history, culture, legal and political status as well as socio-demographic factors of each Indigenous or Tribal group. Unfortunately the political situation in some countries has meant that in some cases authors have not been able to include important facts pertaining to their Indigenous peoples.

A Global Snapshot of Indigenous and Tribal People's Health: The Lancet–Lowitja Institute Collaboration

Cancer in Australia 2017 (AIHW)

Cancer in Australia 2017 presents the latest available information on national population screening programs, Medicare data, cancer incidence, hospitalisations, survival, prevalence, mortality and burden of disease.

Key points:

* Cancer is the leading cause of disease burden in Australia

* For all cancers combined, the incidence rate increased from 383 per 100,000 persons in 1982 to 504 per 100,000 in 2008, before an expected decrease to 470 per 100,000 in 2017

* During the same period, the mortality rate decreased from 209 per 100,000 in 1982 to 161 per 100,000 in 2017

* Cancer survival has improved over time

* It is estimated that the most commonly diagnosed cancers in Australia in 2017 will be breast cancer in females, followed by colorectal cancer and prostate cancer (excluding basal and squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, as these cancers are not notifiable diseases in Australia)

Media release: More cancer cases diagnosed, but overall rates falling and survival rates improving.

Download report: Cancer in Australia 2017

Cancer in Australia: in brief 2017.

Australian Cancer Incidence and Mortality (ACIM) books

Wednesday, 1 February 2017

Suicide Prevention Programs in Construction

Tradies in Australia are 6 times more likely to kill themselves than to die in an accident onsite. If building companies are to invest in safety and health, why not invest in setting up suicide prevention programs?

According to the latest report on suicide in the construction industry by MATES in Construction, on average 169 construction workers killed themselves each year between 2001 and 2013. That means one construction worker committed suicide every two days. The alarmingly high suicide figure in the Australian construction industry leaves many families with broken hearts and results in an estimated cost of $1.57 billion dollars per year.

See more at: https://sourceable.net/suicide-prevention-program-in-construction/

Monday, 30 January 2017

Good outcomes with 'telepsychiatry' in medical treatment of opioid use disorder

For people with opioid use disorder receiving medication treatment with buprenorphine, a telepsychiatry approach--using videoconferencing as an alternative to in-person group sessions--provides similar clinical outcomes, reports a study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM.)

The pilot study suggests that telepsychiatry might help to extend the availability of medication for addiction treatment (often known as medication-assisted treatment, or MAT) for opioid use disorder--particularly in rural areas. "Telepsychiatry may present a promising way to deliver MAT to this population and expand access to care," write Dr. Wanhong Zheng and colleagues of West Virginia University, Morgantown.

See more at: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-01/wkh-gow012517.php

Friday, 13 January 2017

Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in Australian public hospitals 2015-16 (AIHW)

Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in Australian public hospitals 2015-16: Australian hospital statistics

* In 2015-16, 1,440 cases of hospital-associated Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) were reported in Australian public hospitals

* The national rate of SAB in public hospitals was 0.73 cases per 10,000 days of patient care, and all states and territories had rates below the national benchmark of 2.0 cases per 10,000 days of patient care

* Between 2011-12 and 2015-16, rates of SAB decreased from 0.96 cases to 0.73 cases per 10,000 days of patient care

Download report: Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in Australian public hospitals 2015-16: Australian hospital statistics

Monday, 9 January 2017

National Cultural Respect Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health 2016–2026

The National Cultural Respect Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health 2016–2026 (the Framework) was launched by the Australian Health Ministers' Advisory Council on 28 October 2016. This 10 year framework seeks to guide delivery of culturally safe, responsive, and quality health care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people generally experience poorer health outcomes than the rest of the Australian population, and while the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people has improved in a number of areas in recent years, ongoing effort is required to achieve sustainable improvements in health outcomes. A fundamental step towards improving health outcomes is to address the many barriers Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience in accessing and receiving appropriate and professional health care. The Framework provides the foundation and guides a nationally consistent approach for building culturally responsive health care design and delivery for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and contributes to achieving the Closing the Gap targets agreed by the Council of Australian Governments (COAG).

The Framework is a renewal of the Cultural Respect Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health 2004–2009 and was developed for the Australian Health Ministers' Advisory Council by the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Standing Committee.

Cultural Respect Framework 2016-2026 for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health

National Framework for Health Services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children and Families

The National Framework for Health Services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children and Families will help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children to get a better start in life. It provides a guide for culturally appropriate maternal health care, pregnancy care and early childhood – setting children and families up for better health throughout their lives.

This work was developed in collaboration with community leaders and a cultural advisory group. We also have consulted widely with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities across the country, listening to what they need, so we can deliver the services that they require in the way that best suits different communities," said Assistant Minister Wyatt.

The Framework will be embedded at the Commonwealth level in Funding Agreements, raising awareness through Aboriginal Health Partnership forums and including the principles in our policy design and program implementation. For example, the Department of Education and Training has agreed to incorporate the Framework into the implementation of Connected Beginnings, building the same principles and shared vision for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children's health across disciplines and jurisdictions.

The National Framework for Health Services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children and Families >

Launch Press Release

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