Friday, 26 February 2016

Aboriginal Communities Improving Aboriginal Health - Report

The purpose of this literature review is to present the evidence supporting the contributions of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services to improving the health of Aboriginal peoples, so that this information is available to all individuals and organisations working to improve Aboriginal health.

This 32 page report was developed for a broad range of individuals and organisations with an interest in improving Aboriginal health. For the Aboriginal community controlled health sector, this report provides information that may be used to inform funding submissions, advocacy efforts and the development of programs as well as highlight gaps in the evidence base about the contributions of ACCHSs. The information in this report will also be useful for funders, policy makers, researchers and others to inform the development of policies, projects and programs that impact on the health of Aboriginal peoples.

Aboriginal Communities Improving Aboriginal Health Report.

Wednesday, 24 February 2016

Research pinpoints devastating impacts of fetal alcohol syndrome

Research reveals the tragic results of alcohol use in pregnancy.Children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders are affected by a range of problems, including anxiety, depression, aggression, delinquency and diminished learning capacity a new review of evidence reveals.
 
Published today in the journal Pediatrics, the research is the first to comprehensively describe behaviours in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) observed by teachers and parents using an empirically based assessment system.
 

Home based health care can be safer and cheaper than hospital care: report

Treating patients in their homes can be a safer and significantly cheaper alternative to hospital care, a report has found, potentially saving state and federal governments tens of millions of dollars annually.

The paper by the University of Western Sydney's Centre for Health Research found home-based health care improved patient satisfaction and quality of life while reducing hospital readmission rates.

In some cases it was also associated with a 20% lower mortality rate.

Please see more at: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-02-23/home-based-health-care-can-be-safer-cheaper-hospital-report-says/7194418

Thursday, 18 February 2016

Mental health experts gather to talk about ice addictions, treatment and solutions

Drug treatment services are still waiting to receive the $241 million the Federal Government promised in response to the National Ice Taskforce's report. It's due to flow in the next couple of months.

While they wait, mental health experts are getting on with the job of helping users deal with the impact of the illicit drug. Some are meeting in Sydney today to learn about new treatments.

And as Lindy Kerin reports, they'll also hear a very personal story from a recovering addict about his treatment. See more at: http://www.abc.net.au/am/content/2016/s4408740.htm

Emotional eating fuelling Australia's obesity epidemic, psychologist says

Emotional eating plays a huge role in Australia's obesity epidemic with 83% of overweight or obese Australians eating emotionally, according to a recent survey.

The mental health side of obesity is not something that has been given much coverage. Anti-obesity campaigns have mostly been based on a version of the old mantra "eat less, exercise more", but is anyone in the country actually not aware of that?

If it is that simple why does the country keep getting fatter? Please see more at:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-02-18/emotional-eating-fuelling-australias-obesity-epidemic/7175204

Wednesday, 17 February 2016

Trends in serious injury due to road vehicle traffic crashes, Australia: 2001-2010 (AIHW)

Trends in serious injury due to road vehicle traffic crashes, Australia: 2001-2010 shows that rates for people seriously injured due to a road traffic crash rose from 141.6 to 146.4 per 100,000 population. Over one-quarter (26%) sustained life-threatening injuries.

Rates of life-threatening injury involving motorcycle riders and pedal cycle riders rose significantly over this period, while rates involving passengers of motor vehicles and pedestrians fell.

Download report: Trends in serious injury due to road vehicle traffic crashes, Australia: 2001-2010.

Review of volatile substance use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people



Edith Cowan University's Australian Indigenous Alcohol and Other Drugs Knowledge Centre have released a comprehensive review of volatile substance use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Volatile substance use (VSU) is an issue of concern to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous Australians. In locations where it is occurring, it impacts considerably on families and broader communities. An increasing number of reviews, reports and inquiries have been conducted over the past three decades, highlighting VSU as a critical issue. In decades past, the lack of progress in implementing recommendations contained in these reports created much frustration and despair in communities. In recent years, however, there has been significant progress, particularly in remote Indigenous communities, though there is still work to be done.

Tuesday, 16 February 2016

2016 Closing The Gap Report

The 2016 Closing the Gap report shows, as in previous years, that there have been mixed levels of success in meeting the targets set by the Council of Australian Governments (COAG)in 2008.

The target to halve the gap in child mortality by 2018 is on track. Over the longer term, Indigenous child death rates declined by 33% and the gap narrowed (by 34%) between 1998 and 2014. Immunisation rates for Indigenous children are high – by the age of five a higher percentage of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are immunised compared with other Australian children.

While total Indigenous mortality rates have declined over the longer term, particularly from circulatory diseases (such as heart disease and stroke) the target to close the gap in life expectancy is not on track, based on data since the 2006 baseline.

In remote areas, 85% of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander four-year-olds were enrolled in preschool in 2013. In December 2015, COAG renewed the early childhood education target, aiming for 95% of all Indigenous four-year-olds enrolled in early childhood education by 2025.

There is mixed progress on the target to halve the gap in reading and numeracy for Indigenous students by 2018. Across the 8 areas (reading and numeracy for Years 3, 5, 7 and 9), the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students achieving national minimum standards is on track in 4 of these 8 areas.

In May 2014, COAG agreed to a new target to close the gap in school attendance by the end of 2018. In 2015, the attendance rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students was 83.7%, little change from the rate in 2014 (83.5%). Progress will need to accelerate for this target to be met.

An increasing proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people are completing Year 12, up from 45.4% in 2008 to 58.5% in 2012-13. This means the target to halve the gap in Year 12 attainment by 2020 is on track. Over the past decade there was a 70% increase in the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in higher education award courses. There is almost no employment gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous university graduates.

The target to halve the gap in employment by 2018 is not on track. Factors such as economic growth, strong Indigenous businesses and gains in Indigenous education will have an impact on the results.

Download the report (and read the full summary)

25 years of health expenditure in Australia 1989-90 to 2013-14 (AIHW)

25 years of health expenditure in Australia 1989-90 to 2013-14 reveals that health expenditure grew from $50.3 billion in 1989-90 to $154.6 billion in 2013-14 in real terms (adjusted for inflation).

Over the period, health expenditure grew much faster than inflation, the population and population ageing. Health expenditure increased from 6.5% of gross domestic product in 1989-90 to 9.7% of gross domestic product in 2013-14.

Monday, 15 February 2016

Hospitalised injuries in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people: 2011-13 (AIHW)

Hospitalised injuries in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people: 2011-13 provides information about hospitalised injuries among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people (0 to 24 years). The most common specific cause of injury among Indigenous children and young people was a fall (24%). Assault was the leading cause of hospitalisation for Indigenous people aged 15-17 and 18-24 years.

Media release: Indigenous children and young people more likely to be hospitalised due to injury

Download report: Hospitalised injuries in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people: 2011-13

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