Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Stolen Generations and descendants: numbers, demographic characteristics and selected outcomes [AIHW]

The AIHW has released  a new report in collaboration with The Healing Foundation.

 

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Stolen Generations and descendants: numbers, demographic characteristics and selected outcomes

 provides estimated numbers and demographic characteristics of the Stolen Generations and descendants using a series of ABS surveys.

 

It also presents a range of health and socioeconomic outcomes for the Stolen Generations and descendants, and differences with Indigenous and non-Indigenous comparison groups, to examine the effects of removal from families.

 

The findings in the report will be useful to assess the needs of the Stolen Generations and their families. 

 

'The data shows poorer health and social outcomes among this group of Indigenous Australians compared to those who were not removed from their families,' said AIHW spokesperson Dr Fadwa Al-Yaman.

'For example, Indigenous people who were removed from their families are more than 3 times as likely to have been incarcerated in the last 5 years, and 1.8 times as likely to rely on government payments as their main source of income and 1.7 times as likely to experience violence compared to those who were not removed.'   They are also more likely to have experienced discrimination, be unemployed or not own a home, and less likely to report good general health.

 

https://www.aihw.gov.au/getmedia/a6c077c3-e1af-40de-847f-e8a3e3456c44/aihw-ihw-195.pdf.aspx?inline=true   Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Stolen Generations and descendants: numbers, demographic characteristics and selected outcomes

 

Media release: New report shows long-term disadvantage for Australia's Stolen Generations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clinical guidlines for atrial fibrillation

Australia's first guidelines for the diagnosis and management of adult patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), released by the Heart Foundation and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ), aim to have a major impact on the condition that causes a third of all strokes in Australia.

AF is linked to 1 in 11 deaths in Australia and is the most common recurrent arrhythmia faced in clinical practice, but its incidence is underestimated because many people do not realise they have it.  A major cause of stroke, AF is projected to double over the next 20 years in Australians aged 55 years and over, while deaths from AF have increased by 82% over the past 10 years.

Heart Foundation chief medical adviser, cardiologist Professor Garry Jennings, said the guidelines aim to have a significant impact on Australians living with AF through evidence-based recommendations on its screening, diagnosis and treatment. "More than half a million Australians currently live with atrial fibrillation, and the condition has a substantial effect on patients' well-being," Professor Jennings said. "But its incidence is underestimated because many patients don't have clinical symptoms. This means AF is often only discovered once it triggers serious consequences, such as stroke.

"The guidelines offer advice in a local context and are based on new and emerging evidence on issues such as the complexities of using newer anticoagulants to prevent stroke, and the patients in whom catheter ablation is recommended.

"The guidelines also advise on the need to prevent, detect and manage several risk factors that can cause AF and increase its complications, including hypertension, diabetes, heart failure, valvular heart disease, and alcohol excess."

From a public health perspective, AF imposes a growing burden on healthcare resources. AF hospitalisations are increasing at a far greater rate than hospitalisations for other cardiovascular conditions, with 10-30% of AF patients admitted to hospital each year.   

Stroke Foundation Clinical Council Chair Associate Professor Bruce Campbell said patients with AF were up to five times more likely to have a stroke than the general community. "Patients with AF are not only more likely to have a stroke, but the strokes caused by AF are more commonly severe or fatal than other ischaemic stroke (caused by a clot) subgroups, so detecting and treating this dangerous condition is vital to a person's health," A/Prof Campbell said.

 "This Australian-first guideline supports health professionals to better assess patient needs for stroke prevention strategies to significantly reduce the occurrence of stroke caused by AF."

Australian Clinical Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Atrial Fibrillation 2018.

The All.Can Cancer initiative patient survey launches in Australia

Australians who have been diagnosed and treated for cancer have the opportunity to share their experiences with the world as part of a global research project spearheaded by All.Can, an initiative committed to improving cancer care. The global patient survey has been launched in 10 countries to identify common issues cancer patients experience with the aim of discovering what is preventing patients from getting optimal cancer care.

The survey is open to all current or former cancer patients.

 

Survey link: http://www.myonlinesurvey.co.uk/allcan_ENAU/

Ethical conduct in research with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and communities: guidelines for researchers and stakeholders

This guide from the National Health and Medical Research Council provides a set of principles to ensure research is safe, respectful, responsible, high quality and of benefit to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities.

The health, wellbeing and experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples continue to be the focus of much research to promote positive outcomes. Over the years, research has contributed to positive outcomes and benefits in, for example, health, medicine and education, and in preserving the languages, stories and songs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and communities in culturally appropriate ways.



However, not all research has been of benefit for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and communities. This absence of benefit can often be understood in the context of ethical considerations related to human research with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities.



Ethical research with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and communities should:

  • improve the way all researchers work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their communities
  • develop and/or strengthen research capabilities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their communities
  • enhance the rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples as researchers, research partners, collaborators and participants in research

Ethical conduct in research with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and communities: guidelines for researchers and stakeholders

National Action Plan for Endometriosis

Health Minister Greg Hunt has launched the National Action Plan for Endometriosis — the first ever blueprint seeking to improve the treatment, understanding and awareness of an often misunderstood and crippling condition.

Endometriosis affects 1 in every 10 Australian women, with the average diagnosis taking between 7 to 10 years. The plan was developed with medical specialists, endometriosis advocacy groups, women with endometriosis and their families, clinicians, researchers and parliamentarians.

In launching the action plan, Minister Hunt noted that while we were at the beginning of this journey, the plan — which outlines a comprehensive 5 year strategy — was a significant step forward for sufferers.

National Action Plan for Endometriosis

Finding real mental health solutions for rural Australia

AUSTRALIA’S mental health support services cannot use a one size fits all approach to lowering rates of mental illness and suicide in rural parts of the nation.
 
This is the opinion of Lifeline Research Foundation executive director Alan Woodward, who said there were a number of unique facets to rural living that led to different challenges than those faced in the city.
 
“The statistics are not great, it shows the further away from a capital city you live the higher the suicide rate is,” Mr Woodward told last week’s Innovation Generation conference in Wagga Wagga.

He said researchers were discovering a range of factors for the poor mental health ratings in rural areas.
 
Read more at: https://www.theland.com.au/story/5532370/finding-real-mental-health-solutions-for-rural-australia/?cs=4932

Aboriginal kids: a healthy start to life

This report was developed in collaboration with the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council and focuses on key improvements in the health of Aboriginal children in New South Wales in the first 5 years of life.

The report emphasises the importance of services and programs being carried out in partnership with Aboriginal people, their communities, the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Sector and across government. Services and programs that have helped to achieve improvements in Aboriginal child health are highlighted throughout the report.

The report is divided into 3 life stages: before birth, infant health and early childhood.

Aboriginal kids: a healthy start to life (Report of the NSW Chief Health Officer 2018).

Assuring equity of access and quality outcomes for older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples: what needs to be done?

This report outlines the proceedings and outcomes of the 5th National Workshop of the Australian Association of Gerontology Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ageing Advisory Group held in Perth in November 2017.

The workshop aimed to address the inequities of access and outcomes for older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples under the current aged care reform program, and suggest directions for the future.

Key issues identified at the workshop were:

  • current barriers to equity of access and quality outcomes
  • specialist targeted services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elders
  • delivery of appropriate care by mainstream aged care service providers
  • an aged care workforce that improves access and quality care
  • advocacy services
  • appropriate aged care needs assessment
  • an evidence-based approach.

Assuring equity of access and quality outcomes for older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples: what needs to be done?

Better Cardiac Care measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (AIHW)

This is the 3rd national report on the 21 Better Cardiac Care measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, with updated data available to report on 14 measures. It shows that while the mortality rate from cardiac conditions is falling among Indigenous Australians, it is still much higher than among non-Indigenous Australians. While access to cardiac-related health services is improving the incidence and recurrent rates of acute rheumatic fever among Indigenous Australians continue to be much higher than in non-Indigenous Australians.

Press release (AHHA): Come a long way, long way to go—cardiac care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Sleep deprived: a third of Australians 'suffering social jetlag'

Almost one in three Australians suffers “social jet lag”, according to a researcher seeking an inquiry into the nation’s sleep deprivation problem. The University of Adelaide sleep specialist Robert Adams said a growing body of research suggested poor sleep was taking a serious toll on Australians’ health and welfare.

A study led by Adams, published on Monday in the journal Sleep Medicine, found that 31% of survey respondents were suffering social jetlag. That is, the time of their sleep on work nights was more than an hour out of sync with sleeps on weekends or other days off.

Read more at: https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2018/jul/09/sleep-deprived-a-third-of-australians-suffering-social-jetlag

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia 2016–17

In 2016–17, 836 publicly-funded alcohol and other drug treatment services provided just over 200,000 treatment episodes to an estimated 127,000 clients.

The top four drugs that led clients to seek treatment were alcohol (32% of all treatment episodes), amphetamines (26%), cannabis (22%) and heroin (5%). The proportion of closed treatment episodes where clients were receiving treatment for amphetamines has more than doubled over the last 10 years, from 11% of treatment episodes in 2007–08 to 27% in 2016–17.

Two-thirds (66%) of all clients receiving treatment in 2016–17 were male and the median age of clients remains at 33 years.

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia 2016–17.

Australia's health 2018 [AIHW]

https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports-statistics/health-welfare-overview/australias-health/overview Australia's health 2018  is the AIHW's 16th biennial report on the health of Australians. It examines a wide range of contemporary topics in a series of analytical feature articles and short statistical snapshots. The report also summarises the performance of the health system against an agreed set of indicators.

 

Australia's health 2018: in brief  is a companion report to Australia's health 2018.

 

https://www.aihw.gov.au/news-media/media-releases/2018/june/our-health-report-card-is-in-and-here-s-what-we-ca Media Release

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overview of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status 2017

The main purpose of the Overview of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status 2017 is to provide a comprehensive summary of the most recent indicators of the health and current health status of Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It has been prepared by Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet staff as part of our contribution to supporting those who work in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health sector. The Overview is a key element of the HealthInfoNet's commitment to authentic and engaged knowledge development and exchange.

The initial sections of this Overview provide information about the context of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, population, and various measures of population health status. Most of the subsequent sections about specific health conditions comprise an introduction about the condition and evidence of the current burden of the condition among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Information is provided for state and territories and for demographics such as sex and age when it is available and appropriate.

While it provides a comprehensive review of key indicators across a range of health topics, it is beyond the scope of this Overview to provide detailed information on other aspects, such as the availability and use of services (including barriers to their use) and strategies and policies related to specific health topics.

Accompanying the Overview is a set of PowerPoint slides designed to help lecturers and others provide up-to-date information. 

Overview of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status 2017

NSW eating disorders toolkit

The NSW eating disorders toolkit aims to assist health professionals in applying best-practice principles in non-specialist inpatient settings in NSW. The Toolkit aims to assist with improving access to practical information, to facilitate consultation with specialist staff and to improve consistency of care for children and adolescents with eating disorders across NSW.

The Toolkit has been developed to provide practical information on key components of care for children and adolescents admitted with an eating disorder including:

• Triage in the Emergency Department;

• Assessment;

• Identifying those in need of admission;

• Admitting the patient;

• Accessing specialist assistance;

• Treatment planning;

• Implementing treatment (primarily medical, nutritional and psychological aspects);

• Involving the family and other health professionals;

• Transition from inpatient care; and

• Accessing further information and support.

The NSW eating disorders toolkit

Pregnancy care guidelines (Aust. Dept. of Health)

The Pregnancy Care Guidelines are designed to support Australian maternity services to provide high-quality, evidence-based antenatal care to healthy pregnant women. They are intended for all health professionals who contribute to antenatal care including midwives, obstetricians, general practitioners, practice nurses, maternal and child health nurses, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers and allied health professionals. They are implemented at national, state, territory and local levels to provide consistency of antenatal care in Australia and ensure maternity services provide high-quality, evidence-based maternity care. The Pregnancy Care Guidelines cover a wide range of topics including routine physical examinations, screening tests and social and lifestyle advice for women with an uncomplicated pregnancy.

Guidelines Webpage.

Impact of a remotely delivered, writing for publication program on publication outcomes of novice researchers

Increased publication of clinician-led health research is important for improving patient care and health outcomes. The aim of this retrospective cohort study conducted in rural Australia was to determine the impact of a writing for publication (WFP) program delivered by teleconference on the publication rates and skill acquisition of novice researchers who have graduated from the New South Wales (NSW) Health Education and Training Institute Rural Research Capacity Building Program (RRCBP).

Publishing research findings in peer-reviewed journals is an important aspect of research knowledge exchange1. However, the motivators to publish vary between individuals and settings. In academic settings, the drive to publish health research findings can potentially be motivated by a need to maximise publication rates for academic advancement or promotion as much as the desire to share findings for the good of health consumers and providers2,3. Within health services, research and the publication of findings is increasingly being linked to translation of research into policy or practice change processes4 aimed at improving health service delivery or health outcomes for consumers.

See more at: https://www.rrh.org.au/journal/article/4468

eHealth program targets young people’s ‘big six’ behaviours to reduce chronic disease risk

University of Newcastle researchers have collaborated on a world-first eHealth initiative aiming to target young people’s ‘big six’ behaviours to help reduce their chronic disease risk.

Associate Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin and Professor David Lubans are part of the online Health4Life Initiative, launched today at UNSW Sydney.Led by UNSW’s Professor Maree Teesson AC, the project aims to help to help thousands of young Australian high school children reduce their chance of developing chronic diseases, including heart disease and mental health disorders, by preventing and modifying lifestyle risk behaviours that commonly emerge in adolescence.

See more at: https://www.newcastle.edu.au/newsroom/featured-news/ehealth-program-targets-young-peoples-big-six-behaviours-to-reduce-chronic-disease-risk

Admitted patient care 2016–17: Australian hospital statistics,

Admissions to public hospitals are growing faster than admissions to private hospitals, according to a new report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

The report, Admitted patient care 2016–17: Australian hospital statistics, shows that of the 11 million admissions to hospitals in 2016–17, 6.6 million were in public hospitals and 4.4 million were in private hospitals.

'Admissions rose by 4.3% on average each year for public hospitals and 3.6% for private hospitals between 2012–13 and 2016–17, and these were greater than the average growth in population of 1.6% over the same period' said AIHW spokesperson Jenny Hargreaves.

In 2016–17, the majority of admissions to public hospitals (83% or 5.5 million) were for public patients—however, about 1 in 7 (14% or 912,000 admissions) were for patients who used private health insurance to fund all or part of their admission.

Public hospitals accounted for the majority of emergency admissions (92%), medical admissions (77%) and childbirth admissions (76%) in 2016-17. 'By contrast, 59% of admissions for surgery were in private hospitals,' Ms Hargreaves said.

Media release

Admitted patient care 2016–17: Australian hospital statistics

MyHospitals: Average length of stay in public hospitals in 2016–17

MyHospitals: Patient admissions in 2016–17