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Tuesday, 14 February 2017

NSW Emergency departments website

NSW Health has launched a new http://www.emergencywait.health.nsw.gov.au/ Real-Time Emergency Department website.



The purpose of this website is to inform members of the public about availability of emergency departments in major NSW hospitals. The website also allows to locate the nearest hospitals and to see a number of patients waiting in the Emergency Rooms.



http://www.emergencywait.health.nsw.gov.au/

Changing associations of selected social determinants with Aboriginal and torres Strait Island health & wellbeing, 2002 to 2012-13

http://caepr.anu.edu.au/Publications/WP/2017WP113.php Changing associations of selected social determinants with Aboriginal and torres Strait Island health & wellbeing, 2002 to 2012-13 by the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research<http://apo.org.au/taxonomy/term/125> uses data from national health and social surveys of the Indigenous population, conducted between 2002 and 2012-13, to examine whether associations of some key social determinants with selected health and wellbeing outcomes changed over that time.

Consistently during the decade, employment status and housing tenure were significantly associated with a range of health and wellbeing outcomes for the Indigenous population.

As education levels have increased among the Indigenous population, the association of education with health and wellbeing has weakened. This suggests that at least some of the association of education with health and wellbeing is attributable to other characteristics of individuals or educational institutions not captured in our models, not just the outcome of the education process itself.

Improvements in some health and wellbeing outcomes in remote areas, despite declining employment over the decade, suggest that more detailed analysis is required to shed light on whether associations between the selected social determinants of health and wellbeing differ for Indigenous people living in remote and nonremote areas.

Monday, 13 February 2017

Hospitalised burn injuries Australia 2013-14 [AIHW]

Hospitalised burn injuries Australia 2013-14<http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=60129557700> Hospitalised burn injuries Australia 2013-14 provides information on cases of burn injury requiring hospitalisation in Australia. While burn injuries make up a small fraction (1%) of all hospitalisations for injury, they are often the most serious and result in numerous re-admissions and long lengths of stay.



In 2013-14 there were 5,430 cases of hospitalised burn injury of which about two-thirds were male. Almost half of all cases (45%) were caused by contact with heat and hot substances such as hot drinks, food, fats and cooking oils.

Download report: Hospitalised burn injuries Australia 2013-14<http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=60129557700>

A Global Snapshot of Indigenous and Tribal People’s Health: The Lancet–Lowitja Institute Collaboration

The purpose of this report is to provide a more detailed understanding of the context of each population included in a paper published by The Lancet in April 2016, 'Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Health (The Lancet–Lowitja Institute Collaboration): A population study' by I. Anderson, B. Robson, M. Connolly et al.

Contributors have endeavoured to provide a summary of the history, culture, legal and political status as well as socio-demographic factors of each Indigenous or Tribal group. Unfortunately the political situation in some countries has meant that in some cases authors have not been able to include important facts pertaining to their Indigenous peoples.



A Global Snapshot of Indigenous and Tribal People's Health: The Lancet–Lowitja Institute Collaboration<https://www.lowitja.org.au/lowitja-publishing/L052>

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Views expressed in this message are those of the individual sender, and are not necessarily the views of NSW Health or any of its entities.

Cancer in Australia 2017 (AIHW)

Cancer in Australia 2017<http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=60129558547> Cancer in Australia 2017 presents the latest available information on national population screening programs, Medicare data, cancer incidence, hospitalisations, survival, prevalence, mortality and burden of disease.

Key points:

*
Cancer is the leading cause of disease burden in Australia
*
For all cancers combined, the incidence rate increased from 383 per 100,000 persons in 1982 to 504 per 100,000 in 2008, before an expected decrease to 470 per 100,000 in 2017
*
During the same period, the mortality rate decreased from 209 per 100,000 in 1982 to 161 per 100,000 in 2017
*
Cancer survival has improved over time
*
It is estimated that the most commonly diagnosed cancers in Australia in 2017 will be breast cancer in females, followed by colorectal cancer and prostate cancer (excluding basal and squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, as these cancers are not notifiable diseases in Australia)

Media release: More cancer cases diagnosed, but overall rates falling and survival rates improving<http://www.aihw.gov.au/media-release-detail/?id=60129558540>

Download report:
Cancer in Australia 2017<http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=60129558547>
Cancer in Australia: in brief 2017<http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=60129558546>
Australian Cancer Incidence and Mortality (ACIM) books.<http://www.aihw.gov.au/acim-books/>
#END

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Views expressed in this message are those of the individual sender, and are not necessarily the views of NSW Health or any of its entities.

Wednesday, 1 February 2017

Suicide Prevention Programs in Construction

Tradies in Australia are six times more likely to kill themselves than to die in an accident onsite. If building companies are to invest in safety and health, why not invest in setting up suicide prevention programs?


According to the latest report on suicide in the construction industry by MATES in Construction, on average 169 construction workers killed themselves each year between 2001 and 2013. That means one construction worker committed suicide every two days. The alarmingly high suicide figure in the Australian construction industry leaves many families with broken hearts and results in an estimated cost of $1.57 billion dollars per year.


See more at: https://sourceable.net/suicide-prevention-program-in-construction/

Monday, 30 January 2017

Good outcomes with 'telepsychiatry' in medical treatment of opioid use disorder

For people with opioid use disorder receiving medication treatment with buprenorphine, a telepsychiatry approach--using videoconferencing as an alternative to in-person group sessions--provides similar clinical outcomes, reports a study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM). The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.


The pilot study suggests that telepsychiatry might help to extend the availability of medication for addiction treatment (often known as medication-assisted treatment, or MAT) for opioid use disorder--particularly in rural areas. "Telepsychiatry may present a promising way to deliver MAT to this population and expand access to care," write Dr. Wanhong Zheng and colleagues of West Virginia University, Morgantown.


See more at: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-01/wkh-gow012517.php

Friday, 13 January 2017

Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in Australian public hospitals 2015-16 (AIHW)

Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in Australian public hospitals 2015-16: Australian hospital statistics

* In 2015-16, 1,440 cases of hospital-associated Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) were reported in Australian public hospitals

* The national rate of SAB in public hospitals was 0.73 cases per 10,000 days of patient care, and all states and territories had rates below the national benchmark of 2.0 cases per 10,000 days of patient care

* Between 2011-12 and 2015-16, rates of SAB decreased from 0.96 cases to 0.73 cases per 10,000 days of patient care

Download report: Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in Australian public hospitals 2015-16: Australian hospital statistics

Monday, 9 January 2017

National Cultural Respect Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health 2016–2026

The National Cultural Respect Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health 2016–2026 (the Framework) was launched by the Australian Health Ministers' Advisory Council on 28 October 2016. This 10 year framework seeks to guide delivery of culturally safe, responsive, and quality health care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people generally experience poorer health outcomes than the rest of the Australian population, and while the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people has improved in a number of areas in recent years, ongoing effort is required to achieve sustainable improvements in health outcomes. A fundamental step towards improving health outcomes is to address the many barriers Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience in accessing and receiving appropriate and professional health care. The Framework provides the foundation and guides a nationally consistent approach for building culturally responsive health care design and delivery for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and contributes to achieving the Closing the Gap targets agreed by the Council of Australian Governments (COAG).

The Framework is a renewal of the Cultural Respect Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health 2004–2009 and was developed for the Australian Health Ministers' Advisory Council by the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Standing Committee.

Cultural Respect Framework 2016-2026 for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health

National Framework for Health Services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children and Families

The National Framework for Health Services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children and Families will help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children to get a better start in life. It provides a guide for culturally appropriate maternal health care, pregnancy care and early childhood – setting children and families up for better health throughout their lives.

This work was developed in collaboration with community leaders and a cultural advisory group. We also have consulted widely with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities across the country, listening to what they need, so we can deliver the services that they require in the way that best suits different communities," said Assistant Minister Wyatt.

The Framework will be embedded at the Commonwealth level in Funding Agreements, raising awareness through Aboriginal Health Partnership forums and including the principles in our policy design and program implementation. For example, the Department of Education and Training has agreed to incorporate the Framework into the implementation of Connected Beginnings, building the same principles and shared vision for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children's health across disciplines and jurisdictions.

The National Framework for Health Services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children and Families >

Launch Press Release

Wednesday, 14 December 2016

Family violence prevention programs in Indigenous communities

The following report describes the latest levels of family violence in Indigenous communities. It has shown that family violence continues to be under-reported. The complexity of different issues made it hard to evaluate. The report discusses which strategies have been succesful. There is also a good bibliography on the topic.

Family violence prevention programs in Indigenous communities

Monday, 12 December 2016

Launch of the #JustJustice book alongside calls to action

Professor Tom Calma at the #JustJustice launch
The #JustJustice book was launched in Sydney recently and politicians and policy makers were urged to 'read and absorb' its advice for stopping the over-incarceration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.The book compiles more than 90 articles from more than 70 contributors published over the past 18 months at Croakey, since more than 300 donors contributed to the crowdfunding campaign that concluded in mid-2015.

About the #JustJustice Book with further links

Download available from this page

Tuesday, 6 December 2016

Aboriginal workforce strategic framework: taking the next STEP UP in growing a strong and culturally supported Aboriginal workforce 2016-2020

The NSW Health Good Health – Great Jobs: Aboriginal Workforce Strategic Framework 2016 – 2020 (the Framework) is intended to support Local Health Districts, Specialty Health Networks and other NSW Health organisations to grow and to develop their Aboriginal workforce. Building on the previous Framework (2011-2015), it sets out the Aboriginal workforce development priorities and desired outcomes for NSW Health for the period 2016 - 2020 and the key actions that need to be taken to achieve these priorities and outcomes.

The Framework is structured around six key priorities areas:

1. Lead and Plan Aboriginal Workforce Development
2. Build Cultural Understanding and Respect
3. Attract, Recruit and Retain Aboriginal staff
4. Develop the capabilities of Aboriginal staff
5. Work with others to achieve workforce priorities
6. Track our achievements and improve results.

Monday, 5 December 2016

Food security and health in rural and remote Australia

Food security and health in rural and remote Australia by Fiona Brooke of the National Rural Health Alliance describes and analyses the prevalence of food insecurity in Australia and the consequent adverse implications for the health and productivity of individuals and communities. It proposes options aimed at improving the health and wellbeing of Australians who experience food insecurity. It notes the role of the agricultural sector in addressing Australian food security. It also highlights the prevalence of food insecurity in remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Physical health and mental wellbeing: evidence guide (Mental Health Commission of NSW 2016)

Improving the physical health of mental health consumers is becoming a priority area for clinicians and policymakers, yet the practical steps needed to achieve this are less clear. This guide aims to provide a summary of the evidence regarding what measures need to be taken to improve the physical health of people living with mental illness. It discusses the evidence for comprehensive lifestyle interventions to help improve the physical health of consumers living with severe mental illness. It provides evidence from proven strategies to improve access to physical health services, as well as health promotion, prevention and early intervention for people with coexisting mental and physical health issues.

Physical health and mental wellbeing: evidence guide