Friday, 20 October 2017

5 new AIHW Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 reports

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare has released 5 new Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 reports today which can be accessed by clicking below.

These reports give the latest information on how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in each state are faring according to various measures of health status and outcomes, determinants of health, and health system performance.
Indicators are based on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework.
The reports highlight the main areas of improvement, and continuing concern.


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report: New South Wales<https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/indigenous-health-welfare/health-performance-framework-2017-nsw/contents/table-of-contents>

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report: Queensland<https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/indigenous-health-welfare/health-performance-framework-2017-qld/contents/table-of-contents>

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report: South Australia<https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/indigenous-health-welfare/health-performance-framework-2017-sa/contents/table-of-contents>

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report: Victoria<https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/the-health-welfare-of-australia-s-aboriginal-torres-strait-islander-peoples/health-performance-framework-2017-sa/contents/table-of-contents>

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report: Western Australia<https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/indigenous-health-welfare/health-performance-framework-2017-wa/contents/table-of-contents>


All reports are available to purchase hard copy, AIHW catalogue numbers at links above.

Monday, 16 October 2017

National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ Mental Health and Social and Emotional Wellbeing 2017-2023

The Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet have launched the new National strategic framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people's mental health and social and emotional wellbeing 2017-2023. The framework sets out a comprehensive and culturally appropriate stepped care model that is applicable to both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander specific and mainstream health services. It will help guide and support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health policy and practice over the next 5 years, and be an important resource for policy makers, advocates, service providers, clients, consumers and researchers.

The framework is designed to complement the Fifth national mental health and suicide prevention plan and contribute to the vision of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health plan 2012-2023.

The framework was developed under the auspices of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Advisory Group, co-chaired by Professor Pat Dudgeon and Professor Tom Calma AO.

National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples' Mental Health and Social and Emotional Wellbeing 2017-2023.

"Head to Health": Australia’s new digital mental health gateway

Australia's new digital mental health gateway, Head to Health, is now live. Head to Health connects people to online and phone mental health services appropriate for their individual needs.

Head to Health will help people to take control of their mental health, at a time and place convenient to them, complementing or in place of face-to-face services. It supports people seeking help - either for themselves or someone they care about.

Head to Health is not only helpful when seeking support for a mental health condition, it also provides information about staying mentally well for every Australian.

Services and resources listed on Head to Health are delivered by Australia's mental health service providers including the Butterfly Foundation, CanTeen, beyondblue and Kids Helpline. They include free or low-cost apps, online support communities, online courses, and phone services that are private and secure.

Head to Health was developed in collaboration with the community, the mental health sector and the Department of Health.

Visit Head to Health for more information.

Building a digital mental health gateway was a key part of the Government's response to the National Mental Health Commission's Contributing Lives, Thriving Communities – National Review of Mental Health Programmes and Services.

Friday, 13 October 2017

New report and web report: Mental Health Services [AIHW]

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare has released a report and web report:

Mental health services-in brief report and Mental Health Services in Australia web report

Mental health services: in brief 2017 provides an overview of data about the national response of the health and welfare system to the mental health care needs of Australians.

Sections that are being updated in the online Mental Health Services Australia pages are
* Mental health services provided by general practitioners
* Mental health service provided in emergency departments
* Community mental health care
* Residential mental health care
* Overnight admitted mental health care
* Same day admitted mental health care
* Restrictive practices

Media release: Access to mental health services through Medicare on the rise with almost 1 in 10 Australians accessing government-subsidised services.

Download report: Mental health services-in brief

Download web report: Mental Health Services in Australia.

Wednesday, 11 October 2017

50 years since citizenship: successes and challenges in Indigenous health

This year, Australia celebrates 50 years since the 1967 referendum, when the nation voted to amend the constitution to allow the federal government to create laws for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and include them in the census. The latest issue of Public Health Research & Practice reflects on some of the changes that have occurred since the referendum, particularly with respect to progress in improving Indigenous health outcomes.

Articles in this issue include an interview with the Indigenous Health Minister, Ken Wyatt, about the policy and politics of improving Indigenous health; a perspective on the Indigenous smoking epidemic and what stage it is at; an article on research priorities in Indigenous cancer and an 'In practice' article describing a NSW Health program established to strengthen the Aboriginal public health workforce.

Non-themed papers look at trends in fall-related ambulance use and hospitalisation among older adults; an overview of child injury surveillance capabilities in NSW; and the validity of self-reported medication use compared with the gold standard, pharmaceutical claims data.

Link to full issue

Friday, 6 October 2017

Health expenditure Australia 2015-16 [AIHW]

Health expenditure Australia 2015-16 is available as either dynamic data or a PDF report.

* Total spending on health in Australia was $170.4 billion in 2015-16, $6.0 billion (3.6%) higher in real terms than in 2014-15. This was the 4th consecutive year that growth was below the 10 year average of 4.7%.

* Despite the low growth, the share of the economy (GDP) represented by health (10.3%) continued to grow, due to slower real GDP growth (2.7%).

Media release: Governments chipping in more for health, as individual Australians pay less.

Download report: Health expenditure Australia 2015-16.

Wednesday, 4 October 2017

Health of Australia's males and females [AIHW]

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare has released two new web reports.

Health of Australia's males and females

* This release updates the AIHW's existing web report on male health and creates a new report focused on female health.
* The reports contain data on chronic conditions, risk factors and comorbidities, including some information on sex-specific health issues (for example, maternal health).

Download report: The health of Australia's females.

Download report: The health of Australia's males.

Wednesday, 27 September 2017

Reporting the Health and Development of Children in Rural and Remote Australia

In 2017, Royal Far West, a not-for-profit organisation providing leadership in rural and remote children's health and wellbeing, commissioned the Centre for Community Child Health to undertake a review of the health and development and wellbeing of children in rural and remote Australia.

Published in September 2017, Reporting the Health and Development of Children in Rural and Remote Australia:

* profiled the population characteristics of children in rural and remote Australia
* identified the current context and the developmental health needs, met and unmet, of vulnerable children and families in rural and remote Australia; and
* provided an evidence-based overview of what is causing the status quo, and what is most effective in addressing these issues.

The Report emphasised the developmental, behavioural and mental health status/needs of children aged 0-12 years of age, and existing gaps in the provision of appropriate services that help address developmental needs and support children, and their families, to reach their potential.

The review presented a range of key findings covering:

* the distribution of children by Indigenous status and remoteness, across each jurisdiction
* the disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children
* the profile of children residing in rural and remote areas in each of the identified jurisdictions
* main service gaps for children and families in remote and rural Australia
* what the evidence says about ways of improving health and development outcomes for children in rural and remote Australia
* strategies shown to be effective in improving access and outcomes for children
* knowledge gaps and opportunities to improve services and outcomes.

Download the full report: Reporting the Health and Development of Children in Rural and Remote Australia

Read the summary report: The Invisible Children: The state of country children's health and development in Australia

Tuesday, 26 September 2017

Pathways to permanent residential aged care in Australia [AIHW]



Some 61,300 people first entered permanent residential aged care (PRAC) in 2013-14. While they used over 1,000 different combinations of other aged care in the preceding years, the most common pathway (used by 1 in 4 people) was through Home and Community Care (HACC). Many pathways showed a similar pattern of moving 'up' to progressively higher levels of support.

Download report: Pathways to permanent residential aged care in Australia: a Pathways in Aged Care (PiAC) analysis of people's aged care program use before first entry to permanent residential aged care in 2013-14.

Wednesday, 20 September 2017

Survey of Health Care, Australia, 2016 [AIHW - ABS]

4343.0 Survey of Health Care, Australia, 2016

The publication presents national-level results from the Survey of Health Care 2016 (Survey). The Survey explored experiences of coordination and continuity of care by people aged 45 and over who had at least one GP visit in the 12 months prior to selection of the survey sample. It covers health status, access and appropriateness of care, plus demographic information for reporting on equity measures.

The Survey was funded by the AIHW and conducted by the ABS. It was designed to provide robust samples for each of the 31 Primary Health Network (PHN) areas and new information for the primary care sector to improve patients' experiences and outcomes. While the forthcoming publication presents national-level results, in 2018 the AIHW will release a series of publications with results by PHN area.

Media release: Over 45s report positive experiences with Australia's health care system.

Download publication: 4343.0 - Survey of Health Care, Australia, 2016.

Friday, 15 September 2017

Stroke: No Postcode Untouched

This report from the Stroke Foundation demonstrates the cities and towns where stroke is having its biggest impact, where the need for stroke survivor support is most urgent and where the future stroke hotspots are located. It contains federal electorate breakdowns of key information including the number of strokes, the number of stroke survivors living in the community and the leading risk factors for preventable stroke.

By looking at the No Postcode Untouched website you can see that the Electorates of Parkes and Calare have over 5800 people living with stroke. In 2017, 429 people in Calare and 421 in Parkes suffered a stroke.

Download the report: No Postcode Untouched: Stroke in Australia 2017.

Thursday, 7 September 2017

New websites connect rural people to mental health support

Each year, 1 in 5 of us will experience a mental health problem. If you live in the city, you are twice as likely to see a psychologist than if you live in a rural area of NSW.

To address this the Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health (CRRMH) and its flagship progran the Rural Adversity Mental Health Program(RAMHP) have launched new websites ensuring rural communities know when, where and how to find mental health support when they need it.

Director of the CRRMH Professor David Perkins said the new websites were developed to make it easy for anyone to find evidence-based information and research, useful resources, and contact details for Rural Adversity Mental Health Coordinators located across NSW.

The visually appealing and easy to navigate websites also include links to research papers, publications and studies on topics such as rural suicide prevention and Aboriginal health and wellbeing.

Centre for Rural & Remote Health website.

Rural Adversity Mental Health Program website.

Wednesday, 6 September 2017

The quality of Australian Indigenous primary health care research focusing on social and emotional wellbeing: a systematic review

This review looks at how to address the challenge of conducting Indigenous-focused primary health care research that is scientifically robust, culturally appropriate and produces community-level outcomes.

Key points:

* More examples are needed of Indigenous-focused health research that are scientifically robust and acceptable to thecommunity
* A range of research designs is used depending on the collaboration, community perspectives and the study aim
* Participatory action research can inform localised interventions and research designs, including randomised designs
* Processes that are culturally sensitive may improve community acceptance. These include two-way learning,participatory, social–ecological and phenomenological approaches
* Research should produce beneficial community-level outcomes

Link to the review.

Monday, 28 August 2017

Planning and evaluating palliative care services in NSW.

A new report by the NSW Auditor-General, Planning and evaluating palliative care services in NSW has found that NSW Health's approach to planning and evaluating palliative care is not effectively coordinated. There is no overall policy framework for palliative and end-of-life care, nor is there comprehensive monitoring and reporting on services and outcomes.

NSW Health has a limited understanding of the quantity and quality of palliative care services across the state, which reduces its ability to plan for future demand and the workforce needed to deliver it. At the district level, planning is sometimes ad hoc and accountability for performance is unclear.

The capacity of LHDs to use accurate and complete data to plan and deliver services is hindered by multiple disjointed information systems and manual data collections. Further, a data collection on patient outcomes, for benchmarking and quality improvement, is not used universally. This limits the ability of districts to plan, benchmark and improve services based on outcomes data.

NSW Health's engagement with stakeholders is not systematic. The lack of an overall stakeholder engagement strategy puts at risk the sustainability and value of stakeholder input in planning and limits transparency.

Over the last 2 years, NSW Health has taken steps to improve its planning and support for districts. The Agency for Clinical Innovation has produced an online resource which will assist LHDs in constructing their own, localised models of care. eHealth, which coordinates information communication technology for the state's healthcare, aims to invest in integrating and improving information systems. These initiatives should help to address many of the issues now inhibiting integrated service delivery, reporting on activity and outcomes, and planning for the future.

Full report

Thursday, 24 August 2017

Western NSW Primary Health Network shows what works in delivering effective Aboriginal health services

The AHHA has released a Deeble Institute Evidence Brief on What works in partnering to deliver effective Aboriginal health services: the Western New South Wales Primary Health Network experience.

This Evidence Brief has been written because early evidence is suggesting that the partnership between the Western New South Wales (NSW) Primary Health Network (PHN) and Aboriginal primary healthcare services in the Western NSW PHN region is proving effective in terms of increased trust and supporting a stronger network of services for local Aboriginal communities. In particular, the structure and governance of services in this PHN region are unique in Australia, and could possibly provide lessons for other PHNs and Aboriginal health programs generally.

The brief outlines and discusses the Western NSW PHN arrangements and how they are supporting and building a stronger platform for the delivery of Aboriginal primary healthcare services in this region.'Western New South Wales Primary Health Network (WNSW PHN) has had some exciting and inspiring success in delivering effective primary health services to Aboriginal people', says Alison Verhoeven, Chief Executive of the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association (AHHA).

In particular, the number of Aboriginal people using integrated care services for chronic conditions more than doubled in the space of only 4 months.

The Evidence Brief is available at: https://ahha.asn.au/publication/evidence-briefs/evidence-brief-15-what-works-partnering-deliver-effective-aboriginal

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