Mesothelioma in Australia 2017 [AIHW]

Mesothelioma in Australia 2017 presents the latest available information on the incidence of mesothelioma in Australia, along with mortality and information on previous asbestos exposure, using data from the Australian Mesothelioma Registry (AMR), the National Mortality Database (NMD) and the Australian Cancer Database (ACD). On average, two people are diagnosed with mesothelioma in Australia each day.

Two new cases of mesothelioma diagnosed every day in Australia, with one of the poorest survival rate of any cancer (Media release)

Medical Specialist Access Framework – a guide to equitable access to Specialist Care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

The Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP) has developed the Medical Specialist Access Framework – a guide to equitable access to Specialist Care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people' (the Framework). The Framework is the RACP's principal contribution to Strategy 1B of the Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023.

The Framework was developed by the RACP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Committee. It aims to increase access by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People across Australia to medical specialists. The Framework consist of principles, enablers of specialist access, tools and resources, as well as case studies showcasing successful models that are enabling greater access by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to medical specialists. The RACP welcomes the opportunity to discuss this further with interested stakeholders.

The Framework and associated documents can be found online at: https://www.racp.edu.au/msaf

Additional rural and urban case studies at :  https://www.racp.edu.au/advocacy/policy-and-advocacy-priorities/medical-specialist-access-framework/medical-specialist-access-framework-case-studies

Defining the Indefinable: Descriptors of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ Cultures and their Links to Health and Wellbeing

This report was funded by the Lowitja Institute and is part of the development of Mayi Kuwayu: The National Study of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Wellbeing; a national longitudinal study exploring the relationship between Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander wellbeing and culture. This review was conducted to explore what cultural factors are important to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and gain an understanding of how these factors relate to health and wellbeing.

We examined the Australian literature as well as publications from countries that have experienced similar colonisation events; primarily Aotearoa (New Zealand), Canada and the United States. Our main findings from this synthesis determined 6 main domains used to describe culture for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. These domains were: Connection to Country; Cultural Beliefs and Knowledge; Language; Family, Kinship and Community; Expression and Cultural Continuity; and Self-determination and Leadership.

Defining the Indefinable: Descriptors of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples' Cultures and their Links to Health and Wellbeing

Chronic conditions and disability 2015 [AIHW]

Chronic conditions and disability 2015

This report explores the association between 8 selected chronic conditions and disability in Australia: coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes, arthritis and related disorders, back pain and problems, osteoporosis, asthma and emphysema. These conditions are generally long term and persistent, and can lead to gradual deterioration of health, and disability. This report examines disability prevalence and severity; and the types of impairments, limitations and restrictions experienced by those with the selected conditions.

Australian Loneliness Report (Australian Psychological Society)

Loneliness is a growing concern globally, because of its reported impact on health and wellbeing.

The Australian Psychological Society and Swinburne University have produced the Australian Loneliness Report, based on a national survey of adults. This examines the prevalence of loneliness and how it affects the physical and mental health of Australians. It is the most comprehensive study of loneliness completed in Australia.

Survey highlights:

• One in four Australian adults are lonely.

• One in two (50.5%) Australians feel lonely for at least one day in a week, while one in four (27.6%) feel lonely for three or more days.

#8226; One in four Australians experience high levels of social interaction anxiety

• Lonely Australians have significantly worse health status (both physical and mental) than connected Australians.

• Lonely Australians are 15.2% more likely to be depressed and 13.1% more likely to be anxious about social interactions than those not lonely.

• Australians over 65 years are least lonely; other age groups experience similar levels of loneliness.

• Australians over 65 years also report better physical and mental health, lower levels of social interaction anxiety, fewer depression symptoms and greater social interaction than younger Australians.

• Younger adults report significantly more social interaction anxiety than older Australians.

Opioid harm in Australia: and comparisons between Australia and Canada [AIHW]

Opioid use and its associated harms is an issue of great public health interest, both within Australia and internationally. This report shows that opioid harms are an issue in both Australia and Canada. Rates of opioid deaths and opioid poisoning hospitalisations in Australia increased in the last 10 years. In 2016, pharmaceutical opioids were involved in more opioid deaths and opioid poisoning hospitalisations than heroin.

Opioid harm in Australia: and comparisons between Australia and Canada

Media release: Report sheds new light on opioid harm in Australia and draws global comparisons.

Nutrition across the life stages [AIHW]

The purpose of this report is to investigate the adequacy of the Australian diet across various life stages to help inform the evidence-base in relation to nutrition-related health determinants for chronic conditions. It brings together the latest available data from a variety of sources, including some previously published results, and also includes new analysis, such as reporting by socioeconomic status and remoteness.

Media release: New report looks at Australians’ diets across different stages of life—and the results aren’t good

Nutrition across the life stages.

Children's Headline Indicators [AIHW]

The Children's Headline Indicators CHI) are a set of 19 indicators endorsed by the Australian Health Ministers' Conference, Community and Disability Services Ministers' Conference and the Australian Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs Senior Officials Committee in 2008 (first reported in 2009).

They are high level, measureable indicators that identify the immediate environments as particularly important to children’s health, development and wellbeing. The CHI are presented from 2006 to 2016 and are grouped into 3 broad topic areas—Health, Early learning and care and Family and community.

NSW drought: Lifeline's toolkit for drought-affected farmers

The impacts of the drought go far beyond just stock, feed and dry paddocks and Lifeline chief executive officer Stephanie Robinson says a holistic toolkit is needed to help people cope.Currently, all of NSW has been declared in drought and with no significant rain in sight many farmers are doing it tough on the land and in the surrounding communities.


Download the Drought Tool- Kit.

Alcohol, tobacco & other drugs in Australia [AIHW]

Alcohol, tobacco & other drugs in Australia

The consumption of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs is a major cause of preventable disease and illness in Australia. This report consolidates the most recently available information on alcohol, tobacco and other drug use in Australia, including key trends in the availability, consumption, harms and treatment for vulnerable populations.

Further information on a range of health, social and economic impacts of alcohol, tobacco and other drug use are also highlighted. It also includes some interactive data tables on tobacco, alcohol, illicit drugs and treatment services.

Older Australia at a glance 2017 [AIHW]

Older people make up a considerable proportion of Australia’s population—in 2017, over 1 in 7 people were aged 65 and over. This report provides an overview of this diverse and growing population group through a range of topics. These outline older people’s demographic characteristics, health status, and service use.

Older Australia at a glance.

Potentially preventable hospitalisations in Australia by small geographic areas [AIHW]

Potentially preventable hospitalisations in Australia by small geographic areas provides information on 22 conditions for which hospitalisation may have been prevented by timely and appropriate provision of primary or community-based health care by Primary Health Network (PHN) and Statistical Area Level 3 (SA3). These include chronic, acute and vaccine-preventable conditions.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescent and youth health and wellbeing 2018—in brief [AIHW]

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescent and youth health and wellbeing 2018—in brief presents key findings from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare's report: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescent and youth health and wellbeing 2018.

It brings together data for Indigenous people aged 10–24 on health and wellbeing outcomes, social and economic determinants of health, health risk factors, and health service use. Young Indigenous Australians report being in good health, but challenges remain.

Media release

Hip fracture incidence and hospitalisations in Australia 2015–16 [AIHW]

In 2015–16, there were an estimated 18,746 new hip fractures in Australia, a crude rate of 199 hip fractures per 100,000 population aged 45 and over. This represents a decline in the rate of hip fractures over time, suggesting that measures to reduce risk factors and prevent falls are having an effect.

Hip fracture incidence and hospitalisations in Australia 2015–16

Indigenous Palliative Care

Palliative Care Australia (PCA) and Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet have launched a new Palliative Care and End-of-Life Resource portal for the workforce who support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The Palliative Care and End-of-Life portal is designed to assist health professionals who provide care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, their families and communities.

Director of the Health InfoNet, Professor Neil Drew, said the portal will support both clinicians and policy-makers to access research and projects on palliative and end-of-life care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

"This collaboration between the HealthInfoNet and Palliative Care Australia will locate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander palliative and end-of-life care resources and make them available all together in the one place for health professionals.

"This will make the relevant information available to the workforce through a state of the art online portal to support decision-making and best-practice care.

"A yarning place will be established in early 2019 to facilitate information sharing and support among clinicians," said Professor Drew.

Dedicated sections of the site deal with Grief & Bereavement, Planning Ahead and Culturally Appropriate End -of-life Care. The site is underpinned by a large selection of publications, resources, policy information, organisation and program details.

Media Release

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth report: youth survey 2017 (Mission Australlia)

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth report: youth survey 2017 (Mission Australlia)

Key findings:

  • 42% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people planned to go to university compared to 72% non-Indigenous young people.
  • Over 50% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people indicated that getting a job was highly important to them and they were more likely to be looking for employment compared to non-Indigenous young people.
  • 27% Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people reported that they had spent time away from home because they felt they couldn't go back. 
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people were more likely than non-Indigenous young people to be extremely/very concerned about drugs, bullying/emotional abuse, personal safety, discrimination and alcohol.
  • The majority of young people indicated feeling positive overall about their lives, however, just under 1 in 10 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people indicated their happiness with life as a whole was a '0' out of 10 (compared to 1 in 50 non-Indigenous young people).
  • The vast majority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people (75%) rated family relationships as extremely or very important to them. Almost twice the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people rated their family's ability to get along as poor (13% compared with 7% of non-Indigenous young people).

Key policy recommendations:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people should be at the centre of policy and practice with solutions designed, developed and led by the young people and their representative community organisations. In order that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people are supported to thrive and reach their full potential there needs to be a focus on:
  • Supporting educational engagement and addressing challenges to further study in culturally appropriate ways.
  • Providing employment and training programs that are Indigenous-led, flexible and responsive.
  • Identifying the deeper, structural causes of mental health difficulties and building on a strong sense of social, cultural and emotional wellbeing.
  • Reducing the high rates of homelessness for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people as a national priority.
  • Designing services that take into consideration the cultural connections of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people and communities.
  • Taking a holistic approach to service design that works across the domains of education, employment, health, housing and social inclusion and combats intergenerational disadvantage

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth report: youth survey 2017 (Mission Australlia)

Media release: Better services and more homes needed to support aspirations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people

Health in Australia: a quick guide (Parliamentary LIbrary)

Health in Australia: a quick guide, produced by the Australian Parliamentary Library, provides a wealth of links to information on the Australian system and who does what within it. Also included are links regarding private health insurance, health expenditure, International comparisons, the health workforce and useful data sources. There is a wealth of information here for anyone trying to find their way around the Australian health system.

Qualitative research in healthcare: modern methods, clear translation - a white paper

This White Paper from the Australian Institute of Health Innovation aims to shine a light on how qualitative methods are being used in health services and medical research contexts, and how they might be used more effectively. It aims to fire the reader's imagination by revealing the scope of qualitative methods across a range of studies, and the impact of qualitative methods on research outcomes and healthcare practices.

In this monograph you will learn about current methods in use, and how they are making a difference to healthcare practice. These include some lesser-known biographical and photographic methods. You will also learn about the way in which research results are being implemented to improve patient safety and the quality of care.

Qualitative research in healthcare: modern methods, clear translation - a white paper.